THE UNITY OF MUSIC AND TEXT IN GLINKA’S ROMANCES


Glinka’s compositional approach is seen in the unity of his compositional ideas and techniques with the Western components of music, which the composer learns from his time spent in Europe. Glinka’s creative output generated a significant effect on Russian composers that succeeded him. One of Glinka’s significant musical compositional outputs is the unique understanding of romance as a genre that defines the unity among music and text. The era of Pushkin and Zhukovsky plays an essential role in shaping the innovative Russian musical style, and Glinka is the first prominent composer to work closely with such poets and other representatives of the Russian Golden Age. This article deals with four of Glinka’s romances set to text by Pushkin and Zhukovsky – “The Poor Singer,” “Sing Not, Thou Beauty, in My Presence,” “The Night Review,” and “Where is Our Rose.” This study focuses on the connections between theory and literature in romances while presenting Glinka’s literary interpretation within his music.